Forensics

Explores the broad spectrum of science and technology used in the search for truth in criminal investigations.

Forensic weapon analysis, Training day at Ossendrecht Policeacademy

Save
it

Forensic weapon analysis, Training day at Ossendrecht Policeacademy

Save
it
Save
it

Using forensic stepping plates a forensic investigator has made his way to the victim. In this simulated crime scene every detail of the victim is captured in 3D with a handheld 3D scanner. The Politieacademie in Apeldoorn has an indoor facility consisting of several rooms which simulates a real home.

Save
it

Recording the actions of the perpetrator using a motion capture suit which renders movement in 3D. These animations are used to reconstruct crimes without the need for the physical presence of the perpetrator.

Save
it

Forensic investigator at a crime scene wearing protective clothing. A bedroom next to the living room inside the 'scenario-simulation-facility' nicknamed 'Silent Witness' at The Politieacademie in Apeldoorn.

Save
it

Forensic investigator in training stepping out of a crime scene at the 'Silent WItness' facility which is located inside a large hall at The Politieacademie in Apeldoorn. This is the front door to the complex consisting of several rooms in which crime scenes are realistically simulated.

Save
it

Under the guidance of a coroner, students are taught how to perform a medical/forensic inspection. All of the 'corpses' are in fact actors who've been made to look like dead bodies.What at first glance would appear to be a head wound in this picture is actually the result of this 'corpse' having laid in a pool of blood.

Save
it

Prior to the autopsy on this 'corpse' the duct tape is removed from the wrists. It's up to the students and the coroner to discover its residue which would indicate the victim has been restrained. (note the presence of livor mortis in this body).

Save
it

The discoloration in this 'corpse' is the result of 'livor mortis' (the gravitational pooling ofblood in the body which occurs after death). The degree of postmortem lividity (or the lack of it) allows coroners to accurately calculate the time of death.

Save
it

Man with a knife in his back

Save
it

Under the guidance of a forensic medical examiner, students are taught how to perform a medical/forensic inspection. All of the 'corpses' are in fact actors who've been made to look like dead bodies. Students in this picture are taught how to photographically document a victim under the guidance of a forensic medical expert.

Save
it

Students are taught how to photographically document a victim under the guidance of a forensic medical expert.

Save
it

Students performing a medical/forensic inspection under the guidance of a forensic medical expert.

Save
it

Students of The Police Academy learning how to collect fingerprints from prepared specimens. Real human hands are used here at The Academic Medical Centre (AMC) in Amsterdam. The hands are from people who have donated their remains to science.

Save
it
Save
it

This picture shows how the skin is removed from the fingertips for fingerprint identification (dactyloscopy).

Save
it

Fire Investigation, how forensic investigators determine the causes of fire. A forensic researcher at work. Documenting the 'virgin' (untouched) scene is of crucial importance. Before the actual investigation is started and things get moved around, every detail is meticulously photographed.

Save
it
Save
it

Fire in the front part of a living room or bedroom. The window, couch, carpet, chair etcetera have all been affected by the fire. The window shows cracks that are inconsistent with destruction by heat. The fire patterns and heat indicators show the fire came from the side of the window. With the help of electronic devices a flammable liquid is discovered on the surface of the couch as well as on the carpet.

Save
it